Tibial tuberosity advancement (TTA) versus a Tibial Plateau Leveling Osteotomy (TPLO) in dogs

As a follow on to yesterday's introductory post on a tibial tuberosity advancement (TTA), here is more from Dr. K on the subject.


Studies evaluating long term outcome of this procedure are currently being performed; however, the current short term follow up seems very promising. The procedure is currently being performed by over 200 veterinarians worldwide and seems to be quickly finding its place in the arsenal of treatment options for damage to the cranial cruciate ligament in canine patients.

I asked Dr. K how the TTA compares to the TPLO procedure and here is a summary of what she told me:

  • The TTA is less invasive but does not address dogs with very steep tibial plateau angles or very large/very small dogs)
  • The TTA is the newest surgical procedure for management of cranial cruciate deficiency in the dog. TPLO is more common than TTA but TTA was only released into clinical practice in 2005 while TPLO has been around since the 1990's.
  • Cost is variable by clinic but comparable between TTA and TPLO.
  • The biggest difference between the two procedures is that TTA moves the tibial tuberosity cranially to help use the quadriceps to neutralize cranial tibial thrust. TPLO undercuts the joint surface and rotates it so that thrust is neutralized. Because of the cut and the dissection, the TPLO is more invasive that the TTA, so patients that have a TTA tend to be more comfortable more quickly.
  • It is too early to tell the long term outcome from the TTA but so far it looks promising.

Has your dog experienced either of these procedures? Feel free to share in the comments so that others can share in your experience.

Related Posts:
An introduction to a tibial tuberosity advacement (say that in one breath, can you?)
What happens when my dog's cruciate ligament tears?
How much did you say a ruptured cruciate ligament cost to treat in my dog?
Ski - a dog who recovered from a cruciate ligament injury without surgery
My dog or cat is limping