Podcast: Pet Nutrition with Dr Patrick Mahaney

I love talking pet nutrition with Dr Patrick Mahaney. There is always something new to learn. This month, we cover the following questions:

  1. How can I find a good guide for the number of calories my cats should eat per day. One goes out when there’s no polar vortex outside, the other two stay in. I don’t believe the suggested amounts on the food bags and cans I buy.
  2. Are there any other options besides prescription diets for pets with renal/kidney issues (c/d, s/d)? I'd really prefer to feed something that is healthier but will also help with struvite/oxolate crystals.
  3. Can you comment on dry vs wet vs raw food. What are your thoughts on a raw diet for allergies? or raw diets in general
  4. How long should a puppy be on puppy food?
  5. Does Patrick feel a puppy should be on probiotics during their vaccination series to reduce/eliminate allergies in the future?
  6. I've been hearing a lot of questions on the grain free diets come up lately. What is the verdict on these for dogs and cats? As well the by-products ingredients being bad - are they really and what exactly are they?

Click on the link below to hear the audio:

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March is Pet Nutrition Month at Embrace Pet Insurance

When you think about it, our bodies, and those of our pets, are incredible machines. For example, these machines fix themselves (most times) when things break, and we don't have to eat precise diets to stay alive (not like my car that only takes a very certain type of very expensive liquid and my mechanic loves that my car doesn't fix itself.)

It doesn't mean though that all that we eat is good for us in the long run, and eating a better quality of food is one way we can improve our health without having to go to the doctor. It's very much the same situation for our pets, yet some people are still unaware that the quality of the food we feed our cats and dogs is incredibly important. Better and more appropriate foods really do make a difference for our pets.

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Podcast: your questions on pet dental health with Dr Patrick Mahaney

This month, we are talking pet dentals. It’s Pet Dental Health Month according to the AVMA so it’s as good a time as any to talk about teeth and pets and why keeping teeth healthy is good for your pet’s overall health.

In our podcast, Dr Patrick and I address the following questions:

What is the current status of dog and cat dental health - good, bad, or plain ugly?

Why is brushing your pet's teeth so important? How can you make it a positive and simple daily task if you're just beginning to brush their teeth?

What are some examples of instances when it might be best to forgo dental care?

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Guest Post: why do a dog or cat dental cleaning?

Embrace friend and advisor, Dr Rex Riggs, talks about why you should go ahead with the expense of a dental cleaning under anesthesia with X-rays. It's needed people!


Periodontal disease is the most common disease seen in our pets. Think about it. If we did not brush our teeth, used no mouthwash, ate whatever we can put in our mouth including, for dogs, that tasty hors d’ourve, the ever popular cat turd, what would our teeth look like? Put on top of this chomping down on deer antlers, bones, and nylabones, and you get a lot of chipped and broken teeth.

How many of us have had root canals?  They are a result of tooth root abscesses and they hurt like a mother. Dogs and cats have these same tooth root abscesses and continue to eat. They are great at hiding their pain.  How they do that is beyond me.  Did I mention tooth root abscesses hurt like a mother? 

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February is Pet Dental Health Month at Embrace Pet Insurance

Did you know that you cannot tell if your cat or dog has periodontal disease by the color of his or her gums?

I did not know that until a few weeks ago. Wouldn't you think that you would see more inflamed gums in pets with periodontal disease?

So what is periodontal disease then? Our friend, Tracy Libby, elaborates:

Periodontal disease is the progressive loss or destruction of the tissues that hold the teeth in the jaws. It starts the same way in dogs as it does in humans - with plaque buildup around and under the gum line. One milligram of dental plaque contains millions of bacteria! 

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