Helping Working Dogs and Cats

The vast majority of working dogs and cats are assisted by charitable organizations and you can help as well by make a donation. Here are some of our favorites to get you started.

Military and Law Enforcement Dogs:

SaveAVet.org helps rescue and support military and law enforcement dogs after they have retired from the field

The Vest-a-Dog Network helps raise money to buy kevlar vests for active K9 constables. They don't take donations directly but here's the webpage with federal and state non-profits that do

Service Dogs:

National Education for Assistance Dog Services (NEADS) also known as Dogs for Deaf and Disabled Americans, provides independence to people who are deaf or have a disability through the use of canine assistance

Canine Partners for Life is dedicated to training service dogs, home companion dogs, and residential companion dogs to assist individuals who have a wide range of physical and cognitive disabilities. 

Canine Companions for Independence enhances the lives of people with disabilities by providing highly trained assistance dogs and ongoing support. It's a favorite of our veterinary advisor, Dr Rex Riggs, who is active with the organization

Do you have any personal favorites or have benefited from one you would like to highlight? I would love to see them in the comments below.

Related Posts

October is Working Dogs and Cats Month at Embrace Pet Insurance
Guest Post: fake service dogs
Podcast: Dr Patrick Mahaney and Laura Bennett talk about the wonder of working dogs and cats
Helping Working Dogs and Cats
One Dog's Passing Highlights the Benefits of Therapy Dogs in Schools

 

 



Podcast: Dr Patrick Mahaney and Laura Bennett talk about the wonder of working dogs and cats

Today's podcast is on working dogs and cats. There are many different kinds of ways dogs work in society such as dogs that sniff out drugs, bombs, fruit and other banned substances, cadaver dogs, seizure or blood-sugar alert dogs, mold-sniffing dogs, and even cancer-sniffing dogs. In addition, there are therapy dogs and cats. And of course, actual dogs and cats that work on the farm or in the field hunting or dragging a sled in the Iditarod.

Our podcast discusses the following questions about working dogs and cats:

  1. What sort of socialization, training, temperament is needed for a working dog or cat? Given that, which breeds tend to trend toward making a good working dog/cat?
  2. What you should look for in choosing a pet that you want to be a working dog/cat - to give yourself the best chance of success in your chosen field. What organizations to look into for more information.
  3. What qualities should your dog possess if you are thinking about having his certified as a therapy dog? What training can you do in advance to get him ready for therapy dog training?
  4. What certifications are needed specifically for working dogs to be considered "one in the same" with their pet parent's? (for example, to go to the mall, on planes, in public places where pets are forbidden overall?)
  5. How should you behave around a working dog? I never know when it’s appropriate or not to pay attention to a working dog.

Click on the link below for the podcast.

Laura Bennett & Dr Patrick Mahaney working dogs  

Related Posts

October is Working Dogs and Cats Month at Embrace Pet Insurance
Guest Post: fake service dogs
Podcast: Dr Patrick Mahaney and Laura Bennett talk about the wonder of working dogs and cats
Helping Working Dogs and Cats
One Dog's Passing Highlights the Benefits of Therapy Dogs in Schools


Other posts by Dr Patrick Mahaney


Dr Patrick MahaneyDr. Mahaney is a veterinarian from the University of Pennsylvania and a Certified Veterinary Acupuncturist, having been inspired by his own chronic pain from Intervertebral Disc Disease to provide accupuncture to his veterinary clients. In addition to Dr Mahaney's house call integrative veterinary medicine business, California Pet Acupuncture and Wellness, he sees patients on an in-clinic basis atVeterinary Cancer Group in Culver City, CA. 

Dr Mahaney writes a veterinary column (Patrick's Blog) forwww.PatrickMahaney.com and contributes to a variety of media, including Perez Hilton's TeddyHilton.com, Fido Friendly, Veterinary Practice News, Healthy Pets and People with Dr Patrick on OutImpactRadio.com, and MSNBC Sunday with Alex Witt and Career Day. His first book, The Uncomfortable Vet, will be available in 2014 through Havenhurst Books



Guest Post: fake service dogs

For working dog month at Embrace, Dr Riggs, talks about the impact of fake service dogs and their impact on true service dogs, plus how you can help do something about it.


Service dogs change people’s lives. That is a fact. There are dogs that detect seizures in epileptics before they happen, dogs that are seeing eyes, dogs able to tell glucose levels in diabetics, and dogs that help people with mundane tasks that we all take for granted.

Service dogs can be true lifesavers. There are many great organizations that train dogs to be service dogs. I have been fortunate to be involved with a wonderful organization, Canine Companions for Independence, for almost 20 years now.

Founded in 1975, Canine Companions for Independence is a non-profit organization that enhances the lives of people with disabilities by providing highly trained assistance dogs and ongoing support to ensure quality partnerships. Headquartered in Santa Rosa, CA, Canine Companions is the largest non-profit provider of assistance dogs, and is recognized worldwide for the excellence of its dogs, and the quality and longevity of the matches it makes between dogs and people. The result is a life full of increased independence and loving companionship.

I have seen so many lives changed in so many ways by these wonderful dogs. These dogs go through extensive training from the time they are born right up to 2 years of age when they are presented to their companion person, which we call graduates.

These dogs know 35 commands. These are very well trained companions. They go everywhere with the graduate. The store, restaurants, sporting events, work, on planes, trains and automobiles. The graduate and their dog companions are a team. The dogs are trained to perform their duties and remain calm and quiet and not to disrupt anyone around them. In fact, if you see a service dog with its working vest on, do not attempt to come up and pet him/her without the graduate’s permission, because they are working, they are not pets.

Unfortunately, a cottage industry in service dog fraud has sprung up and you can find a number of internet websites willing to sell service dog’s vests along with “identification papers” to anyone willing to pay them. These fake vests are causing a lot of inconvenience and hassle to the legitimate service dogs and their companions. People then use them fake vests to take their dogs into public areas where other pets are not allowed.  Untrained dogs can cause all sorts of problems that make some business owners deny access to real service dogs and the graduate. Denying a service dog’s access to a public place is a violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act. 

Corey Hudson, CEO of Canine Companions for Independence, is spearheading a letter writing campaign to the Department of Justice to stop the sale of these fake vests. If you believe service dog vests should only be for true service dogs, please go to the website cci.org/stopfraud to send a letter yourself.

Remember…. “Some angels have wings…others have tails”.

Related Posts

October is Working Dogs and Cats Month at Embrace Pet Insurance
Guest Post: fake service dogs
Podcast: Dr Patrick Mahaney and Laura Bennett talk about the wonder of working dogs and cats
Helping Working Dogs and Cats
One Dog's Passing Highlights the Benefits of Therapy Dogs in Schools

Other posts by Dr Riggs

Dr_RiggsDr. Rex Riggs grew up in Wadsworth, Ohio, near Akron. Dr Riggs is co-owner of Best Friends Veterinary Hospital in Powell, Ohio. He is also on the board of the North Central Region of Canine Companions of Independence, a board member of The Ohio State College of Veterinary Medicine Alumni Society and Small Animal Practitioner Advancement Board at The Ohio State College of Veterinary Medicine.

Dr. Riggs lives in Lewis Center, OH with his wife Nancy, their dogs Maggie and Ossa, and cat Franklin. Outside of work, Dr. Riggs is an avid golfer and cyclist, and enjoys travel and photography.



October is Working Dogs and Cats Month at Embrace Pet Insurance

This month, we are celebrating working dogs and cats of all types at Embrace Pet Insurance.

And before you ask, yes, there are cats that do "work". Apart from cleaning up the rodents on the premises (which your cat may or may not have a talent for), some cats are quite good at being therapy cats, whether in a hospital, nursing home, or in your own home.

Having said that, dogs pull a lot of weight when it comes to work. There are police dogs that work actively in the field plus sniff out drugs, bombs, fruit and other banned substances, and of course, criminals. There are cadaver dogs, seizure or blood-sugar alert dogs, mold-sniffing dogs, and even cancer-sniffing dogs? And of course, dogs and cats that work on the farm or in the field hunting or dragging a sled in the Iditarod.

So we shall have an interesting month being amazed at all the things that cats and dogs do for us apart from being excellent companions.

Another use for Dell Server boxes - hidey hole! Another use for Dell Server boxes - hidey hole! Another use for Dell Server boxes - hidey hole!Dogs and cats at the Embrace offices. (RIP Bruiser, the wonderful gentlemanly mastiff in the middle there. He just passed away from cancer aged 11. We miss you big guy)

Related Posts

October is Working Dogs and Cats Month at Embrace Pet Insurance
Guest Post: fake service dogs
Podcast: Dr Patrick Mahaney and Laura Bennett talk about the wonder of working dogs and cats
Helping Working Dogs and Cats
One Dog's Passing Highlights the Benefits of Therapy Dogs in Schools



Podcast: Dr Patrick Mahaney and Laura Bennett talk pet insurance

Laura May 2013This time, the tables are turned and Dr Patrick Mahaney asks me, Laura Bennett, CEO of Embrace Pet Insurance (EPI), questions on the topic of pet insurance. It is after all, Pet Health Insurance Month.

Questions covered are:

  • What is the (estimated) number or percentage of pet owners in the U.S. who have insurance for their pets?
  • What are EPI’s top canine and feline health claims?
  • What are the main reasons pet owners give for establishing health insurance for their cats and dogs?
  • Why should a pet owner get pet insurance?
  • Does the typical pet owner keep their pet on Embrace's insurance throughout the pet's life?
  • Does EPI cover any pre-existing conditions?
  • Does EPI cover complementary and alternative medicine, such as acupuncture, physical therapy, chiropractic, and so on?

Click on the link below for the podcast.

Laura Bennett & Dr Patrick Mahaney pet insurance 2013

Related Posts

September is Pet Health Insurance Month Across North America
Guest Post: Veterinary Perspective on Pet Insurance
Podcast: Dr Patrick Mahaney and Laura Bennett talk pet insurance

Other posts by Dr Patrick Mahaney


Dr Patrick MahaneyDr. Mahaney is a veterinarian from the University of Pennsylvania and a Certified Veterinary Acupuncturist, having been inspired by his own chronic pain from Intervertebral Disc Disease to provide accupuncture to his veterinary clients. In addition to Dr Mahaney's house call integrative veterinary medicine business, California Pet Acupuncture and Wellness, he sees patients on an in-clinic basis atVeterinary Cancer Group in Culver City, CA. 

Dr Mahaney writes a veterinary column (Patrick's Blog) forwww.PatrickMahaney.com and contributes to a variety of media, including Perez Hilton's TeddyHilton.com, Fido Friendly, Veterinary Practice News, Healthy Pets and People with Dr Patrick on OutImpactRadio.com, and MSNBC Sunday with Alex Witt and Career Day. His first book, The Uncomfortable Vet, will be available in 2013 through Havenhurst Books