Podcast: Addressing Problem Behaviors by Dr. Patrick Mahaney

Today’s podcast issue is well, just that...behavioral issues. We’re looking at behavioral modification from both the medical and training angles.

Some of the common concerns Dr. Patrick Mahaney and I tackle are:

  1. Separation anxiety: Separation anxiety is frustrating and there's often no easy fix. What really works? What are the current medication recommendations when training and other behavioral methods don't work. Are there really more anxious pets or are pet anxiety issues just more often diagnosed than they were 10 years ago?
  2. Litterbox issues: With inappropriate urination and defecation being the leading causes of cats being surrendered to shelters, any special tips or tricks you can recommend to owners struggling with litterbox problems?
  3. Canine inappropriate behaviors: What trends are you finding helpful in the management or correction of inappropriate canine behaviors like excessive barking, chewing, digging, scratching, etc?
  4. Finding a trainer: Do you have any "must-have" recommendations for pet parents that are looking for a trainer or behaviorist? What sorts of professionals do you recommend and who should we avoid? (link mentioned: American College of Veterinary Behaviorists)

 

Click on the link below to hear the audio:
 
Podcast: Laura Bennett & Dr Patrick Mahaney Problem Behavior 2014

Congratulations to Dr. Mahaney's dog, Cardiff, on his 9th birthday and chemo completion! For additional information on the Canine Lymphoma Education Awareness and Research Foundation, visit their website.

Related Posts
August is Solving Problem Behavior Month
 
Other posts by Dr Patrick Mahaney


Dr Patrick MahaneyDr. Mahaney is a veterinarian from the University of Pennsylvania and a Certified Veterinary Acupuncturist, having been inspired by his own chronic pain from Intervertebral Disc Disease to provide accupuncture to his veterinary clients. In addition to Dr Mahaney's house call integrative veterinary medicine business, California Pet Acupuncture and Wellness, he sees patients on an in-clinic basis at Veterinary Cancer Group in Culver City, CA. Dr Mahaney writes a veterinary column (Patrick's Blog) forwww.PatrickMahaney.com and contributes to a variety of media, including Perez Hilton's TeddyHilton.com, Fido Friendly, Veterinary Practice News, Healthy Pets and People with Dr Patrick on OutImpactRadio.com, and MSNBC Sunday with Alex Witt and Career Day. His first book, The Uncomfortable Vet, will be available in 2015 through Havenhurst Books



Podcast: Considering Pet Safety by Dr Patrick Mahaney

Today’s podcast topic is pet safety, which can cover a multitude of areas. Safety in the home, safety interacting with other people and dogs, safety in different environments.

The questions Dr Patrick Mahaney and I tackle are:

  1. Recently a friend told me that it was OK to leave his dog in the car if it was in the shade with the windows down a crack. Can you give us some facts on internal/external temperatures of a car so show that’s just not going to help
  2. Can you talk about the Yellow Dog Project? It’s big out in Colorado
  3. Any suggestions on important first aid type items to keep on hand for your pets? [link mentioned http://www.humanesociety.org/animals/resources/tips/pet_first_aid_kit.html] Can you do the Heimlich Maneuver on your dog?
  4. Where’s an official place to get alerted about pet food recalls? Often the press releases are put out late Friday afternoon and I might miss an important one (fda site) [link mentioned www.thetruthaboutpetfood.com]
  5. I have big dogs so don’t crate them in the car. What do you suggest for car safety while traveling? [link mentioned

    http://fidoseofreality.com/car-restraints-dogs-big-lie/]

  6. The most frequent accident claim we see at Embrace is swallowing of a foreign object. Can you go over how to prevent and what to do if your dog or cat swallows something he/she shouldn’t

  7. What guidelines do you suggest for dog chew toys to stay safe?

Click on the link below to hear the audio:
 
Podcast: Laura Bennett & Dr Patrick Mahaney Pet Safety 2014

Related Posts
July is Pet Safety Month at Embrace
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Podcast: considering pet safety by Dr Patrick Mahaney 

Other posts by Dr Patrick Mahaney

Dr Patrick MahaneyDr. Mahaney is a veterinarian from the University of Pennsylvania and a Certified Veterinary Acupuncturist, having been inspired by his own chronic pain from Intervertebral Disc Disease to provide accupuncture to his veterinary clients. In addition to Dr Mahaney's house call integrative veterinary medicine business, California Pet Acupuncture and Wellness, he sees patients on an in-clinic basis at Veterinary Cancer Group in Culver City, CA. Dr Mahaney writes a veterinary column (Patrick's Blog) forwww.PatrickMahaney.com and contributes to a variety of media, including Perez Hilton's TeddyHilton.com, Fido Friendly, Veterinary Practice News, Healthy Pets and People with Dr Patrick on OutImpactRadio.com, and MSNBC Sunday with Alex Witt and Career Day. His first book, The Uncomfortable Vet, will be available in 2015 through Havenhurst Books



Podcast: Pet Nutrition with Dr Patrick Mahaney

I love talking pet nutrition with Dr Patrick Mahaney. There is always something new to learn. This month, we cover the following questions:

  1. How can I find a good guide for the number of calories my cats should eat per day. One goes out when there’s no polar vortex outside, the other two stay in. I don’t believe the suggested amounts on the food bags and cans I buy.
  2. Are there any other options besides prescription diets for pets with renal/kidney issues (c/d, s/d)? I'd really prefer to feed something that is healthier but will also help with struvite/oxolate crystals.
  3. Can you comment on dry vs wet vs raw food. What are your thoughts on a raw diet for allergies? or raw diets in general
  4. How long should a puppy be on puppy food?
  5. Does Patrick feel a puppy should be on probiotics during their vaccination series to reduce/eliminate allergies in the future?
  6. I've been hearing a lot of questions on the grain free diets come up lately. What is the verdict on these for dogs and cats? As well the by-products ingredients being bad - are they really and what exactly are they?

Click on the link below to hear the audio:

Laura Bennett & Dr Patrick Mahaney Pet Nutrition 2014


 One website that Dr Patrick mentions is a Basic Calorie Calculator that's provided by Ohio State's Veterinary Medical Center. You can calculate your dog's ideal caloric intake per day using the formula on this page.

Related Posts
March is Pet Nutrition Month at Embrace Pet Insurance
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Dr Patrick MahaneyDr. Mahaney is a veterinarian from the University of Pennsylvania and a Certified Veterinary Acupuncturist, having been inspired by his own chronic pain from Intervertebral Disc Disease to provide accupuncture to his veterinary clients. In addition to Dr Mahaney's house call integrative veterinary medicine business, California Pet Acupuncture and Wellness, he sees patients on an in-clinic basis at Veterinary Cancer Group in Culver City, CA. Dr Mahaney writes a veterinary column (Patrick's Blog) forwww.PatrickMahaney.com and contributes to a variety of media, including Perez Hilton's TeddyHilton.com, Fido Friendly, Veterinary Practice News, Healthy Pets and People with Dr Patrick on OutImpactRadio.com, and MSNBC Sunday with Alex Witt and Career Day. His first book, The Uncomfortable Vet, will be available in 2014 through Havenhurst Books



Podcast: your questions on pet dental health with Dr Patrick Mahaney

This month, we are talking pet dentals. It’s Pet Dental Health Month according to the AVMA so it’s as good a time as any to talk about teeth and pets and why keeping teeth healthy is good for your pet’s overall health.

In our podcast, Dr Patrick and I address the following questions:

What is the current status of dog and cat dental health - good, bad, or plain ugly?

Why is brushing your pet's teeth so important? How can you make it a positive and simple daily task if you're just beginning to brush their teeth?

What are some examples of instances when it might be best to forgo dental care?

What OTC products work best for helping to control dental tartar, etc. (examples are the water additives, gels, chews, etc.) for your pet in addition to brushing their teeth?

I've heard that once you do a dental cleaning, you have to continue doing them regularly because it wears away the teeth and leaves them vulnerable. Is that true?

Click on the link below to hear the audio:

Laura Bennett & Dr Patrick Mahaney Pet Dental Month
 

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Dr Patrick MahaneyDr. Mahaney is a veterinarian from the University of Pennsylvania and a Certified Veterinary Acupuncturist, having been inspired by his own chronic pain from Intervertebral Disc Disease to provide accupuncture to his veterinary clients. In addition to Dr Mahaney's house call integrative veterinary medicine business, California Pet Acupuncture and Wellness, he sees patients on an in-clinic basis at Veterinary Cancer Group in Culver City, CA. Dr Mahaney writes a veterinary column (Patrick's Blog) forwww.PatrickMahaney.com and contributes to a variety of media, including Perez Hilton's TeddyHilton.com, Fido Friendly, Veterinary Practice News, Healthy Pets and People with Dr Patrick on OutImpactRadio.com, and MSNBC Sunday with Alex Witt and Career Day. His first book, The Uncomfortable Vet, will be available in 2014 through Havenhurst Books

 



January is Pet Training Month at Embrace Pet Insurance

Just as understanding how you can maximize your pet's health is part of pet parenting, so is maximizing the quality time you spend together. Training isn't just for tricks; training also:

  • strengthens the bond between you and your dog or cat
  • integrates your pet seamlessly into your family life and the outside world
  • improves the effectiveness of your communication with your pet
  • lets you give your pet more freedom and fewer restrictions
  • and reduces stress and increases happiness of having a pet in the household

Friend of Embrace, Liz Palika, talks about why you should train your dog in her article No Training? Why Not? Rules are important for your dog's social well-being, as well as your own, plus he/she is safer if she's not dashing up the road every time you open your door. And training can be fun - it's not boot camp for either party.

We have a lot of cat and dog training articles on in The Water Bowl, the Embrace informational website on pet health and care, including:

How to Choose a Dog Trainer or Behavior Consultant

Training your Puppy: A Family Affair

Training Your Dog to Come: Make It a Good Thing

How to Carrier Train your Cat

How to Teach your Cat to Enjoy Being Held 

And so on. There are many others listed in the Training Section on our Pet Behavior and Training page.

And yes, we have quite a number of articles on trick training too:

Building a trick routine

Have fun with a hoop 

And many others.

Got any tips that have worked for you you want to share?

Related Posts
January is Pet Training Month at Embrace Pet Insurance
Guest Post: an important reason to train your dog
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Podcast: Dr Patrick Mahaney on Winter Dangers

It was rather a chilly 8 degrees here this morning in sunny Cleveland so it made me think of my podcast with Dr Mahaney on winter dangers. Here are the questions we discuss: 

Carrie: pancreatitis is common during the holidays due to dietary indiscretions; eating holiday decorations; stranger fear if a pet is anxious. Any other holiday dangers to watch out for?

Adrienne: How about the hidden dangers pets may encounter in a snow-covered landscape - whether at home or out hiking on a trail or in the woods. And how can you tell if your pet may be getting too cold when they are outside.

Jessica: what can you do to protect paws of dogs that refuse to wear boots?

Jessica: I have a "winter" emergency kit in my car for myself....what items should be standard for a canine kit?

Chrissy: can Dr Patrick reiterate the danger of antifreeze? It takes such a small amount to be fatal.

In his answer, Dr Mahaney mentions Musher's Secret,  a dense, paw barrier made of natural wax.

Click on the link below to hear the podcast.

Laura Bennett & Dr Patrick Mahaney winter dangers 2013

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Dr Patrick MahaneyDr. Mahaney is a veterinarian from the University of Pennsylvania and a Certified Veterinary Acupuncturist, having been inspired by his own chronic pain from Intervertebral Disc Disease to provide accupuncture to his veterinary clients. In addition to Dr Mahaney's house call integrative veterinary medicine business, California Pet Acupuncture and Wellness, he sees patients on an in-clinic basis at Veterinary Cancer Group in Culver City, CA. Dr Mahaney writes a veterinary column (Patrick's Blog) forwww.PatrickMahaney.com and contributes to a variety of media, including Perez Hilton's TeddyHilton.com, Fido Friendly, Veterinary Practice News, Healthy Pets and People with Dr Patrick on OutImpactRadio.com, and MSNBC Sunday with Alex Witt and Career Day. His first book, The Uncomfortable Vet, will be available in 2014 through Havenhurst Books

 



Podcast: Dr Patrick Mahaney on pet cancer

Continuing on the topic of pet cancer this month, Dr Patrick Mahaney and I talk about the ins and outs of cancer in dogs and cats. Some of the questions we cover are:

  1. Do you think cancer is becoming more prevalent in pets, or do we just know more? If you feel it may be becoming more prevalent, besides genetics, do you think there are any specific environmental factors that contribute to this?
  2. What is the prognosis with cancer in cats and dogs? Can you cure cancer or are you just delaying the inevitable?
  3. What about early detection? What are the signs and what regular diagnostics should we be doing?
  4. What does he think of new product such as apocaps, which supposedly stimulate apoptosis which targets cancer cells?
  5. What other new or newer cancer treatments there are?
  6. Which dogs are more prone to cancer than others? How can cancer be hereditary?

Click on the link below for the podcast.

Laura Bennett & Dr Patrick Mahaney cancer 2013

 

Related Posts
November is Cancer Awareness Month at Embrace Pet Insurance
Guest Post: Cancer Sucks, For Pets as well as Humans 
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Other posts by Dr Patrick Mahaney

Dr Patrick MahaneyDr. Mahaney is a veterinarian from the University of Pennsylvania and a Certified Veterinary Acupuncturist, having been inspired by his own chronic pain from Intervertebral Disc Disease to provide accupuncture to his veterinary clients. In addition to Dr Mahaney's house call integrative veterinary medicine business, California Pet Acupuncture and Wellness, he sees patients on an in-clinic basis atVeterinary Cancer Group in Culver City, CA.
Dr Mahaney writes a veterinary column (Patrick's Blog) forwww.PatrickMahaney.com and contributes to a variety of media, including Perez Hilton's TeddyHilton.com, Fido Friendly, Veterinary Practice News, Healthy Pets and People with Dr Patrick on OutImpactRadio.com, and MSNBC Sunday with Alex Witt and Career Day. His first book, The Uncomfortable Vet, will be available in 2014 through Havenhurst Books

 



Podcast: Dr Patrick Mahaney and Laura Bennett talk about the wonder of working dogs and cats

Today's podcast is on working dogs and cats. There are many different kinds of ways dogs work in society such as dogs that sniff out drugs, bombs, fruit and other banned substances, cadaver dogs, seizure or blood-sugar alert dogs, mold-sniffing dogs, and even cancer-sniffing dogs. In addition, there are therapy dogs and cats. And of course, actual dogs and cats that work on the farm or in the field hunting or dragging a sled in the Iditarod.

Our podcast discusses the following questions about working dogs and cats:

  1. What sort of socialization, training, temperament is needed for a working dog or cat? Given that, which breeds tend to trend toward making a good working dog/cat?
  2. What you should look for in choosing a pet that you want to be a working dog/cat - to give yourself the best chance of success in your chosen field. What organizations to look into for more information.
  3. What qualities should your dog possess if you are thinking about having his certified as a therapy dog? What training can you do in advance to get him ready for therapy dog training?
  4. What certifications are needed specifically for working dogs to be considered "one in the same" with their pet parent's? (for example, to go to the mall, on planes, in public places where pets are forbidden overall?)
  5. How should you behave around a working dog? I never know when it’s appropriate or not to pay attention to a working dog.

Click on the link below for the podcast.

Laura Bennett & Dr Patrick Mahaney working dogs  

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Other posts by Dr Patrick Mahaney


Dr Patrick MahaneyDr. Mahaney is a veterinarian from the University of Pennsylvania and a Certified Veterinary Acupuncturist, having been inspired by his own chronic pain from Intervertebral Disc Disease to provide accupuncture to his veterinary clients. In addition to Dr Mahaney's house call integrative veterinary medicine business, California Pet Acupuncture and Wellness, he sees patients on an in-clinic basis atVeterinary Cancer Group in Culver City, CA. 

Dr Mahaney writes a veterinary column (Patrick's Blog) forwww.PatrickMahaney.com and contributes to a variety of media, including Perez Hilton's TeddyHilton.com, Fido Friendly, Veterinary Practice News, Healthy Pets and People with Dr Patrick on OutImpactRadio.com, and MSNBC Sunday with Alex Witt and Career Day. His first book, The Uncomfortable Vet, will be available in 2014 through Havenhurst Books



Podcast: Dr Patrick Mahaney and Laura Bennett talk pet insurance

Laura May 2013This time, the tables are turned and Dr Patrick Mahaney asks me, Laura Bennett, CEO of Embrace Pet Insurance (EPI), questions on the topic of pet insurance. It is after all, Pet Health Insurance Month.

Questions covered are:

  • What is the (estimated) number or percentage of pet owners in the U.S. who have insurance for their pets?
  • What are EPI’s top canine and feline health claims?
  • What are the main reasons pet owners give for establishing health insurance for their cats and dogs?
  • Why should a pet owner get pet insurance?
  • Does the typical pet owner keep their pet on Embrace's insurance throughout the pet's life?
  • Does EPI cover any pre-existing conditions?
  • Does EPI cover complementary and alternative medicine, such as acupuncture, physical therapy, chiropractic, and so on?

Click on the link below for the podcast.

Laura Bennett & Dr Patrick Mahaney pet insurance 2013

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Dr Patrick MahaneyDr. Mahaney is a veterinarian from the University of Pennsylvania and a Certified Veterinary Acupuncturist, having been inspired by his own chronic pain from Intervertebral Disc Disease to provide accupuncture to his veterinary clients. In addition to Dr Mahaney's house call integrative veterinary medicine business, California Pet Acupuncture and Wellness, he sees patients on an in-clinic basis atVeterinary Cancer Group in Culver City, CA. 

Dr Mahaney writes a veterinary column (Patrick's Blog) forwww.PatrickMahaney.com and contributes to a variety of media, including Perez Hilton's TeddyHilton.com, Fido Friendly, Veterinary Practice News, Healthy Pets and People with Dr Patrick on OutImpactRadio.com, and MSNBC Sunday with Alex Witt and Career Day. His first book, The Uncomfortable Vet, will be available in 2013 through Havenhurst Books

 



Podcast: Dr Patrick Mahaney on Pet Disaster Preparedness

Today’s topic is disaster preparedness for pets, something to think about as fires rage, hurricanes threaten, and earthquakes lurk.

Our monthly podcast starts with Dr Patrick Mahaney talking about disasters he has had to face in his practice followed by these questions:

  1. Adrienne: could you touch on some of the common disasters encountered in regional areas of the country and perhaps some uncommon ones that people may not think of or are aware of?
  2. Kate: I'm guessing we should have a plan in place in case of disaster for our pets... what would that plan look like?
  3. Adrienne (who has a volunteer search and rescue dog): could you outline the necessary items to be included in a disaster preparedness kit: 
    • What things you will need to care for your pet in the event of a disaster or if you
      would need to evacuate (floods, fires, hurricanes, etc.) 
    • What types of contact information and identification for the pet do you need in case
      you should become separated. 
    • Also what the length of time the kit should cover and how often it should be
      updated/changed?
  4. Katie: During Sandy, those who didn't evacuate were forced to leave their pets behind for days, some a week or more, until the barrier island reopened. While we all know having evacuated sooner could have avoided the issue, are there any suggestions on what to do in that event to
    help keep your pet safe until you can return?

 Click on the link below for the podcast.

 

Laura Bennett & Dr Patrick Mahaney disaster preparedness 2013

Links Mentioned:

Earthquake and Tsunami Disaster in Japan Reinforces Need for Global Pet Emergency Preparedness
Pet-Pac Survival Packs

Dr Mahaney also recommends the following items for your own pet first aid kit:

  1. Pet health information in waterproof container/bag 
  2. Vaccination (Rabies) status, list of medications, current photo, veterinarian/hospital, etc.
  3. Nylon leash attached to carabiner
  4. Surgical mask and clear eye shields- to protect your face and eyes
  5. Absorbent gauze pads and roll (can be used as tourniquet)
  6. Sterile, non-stick gauze pads
  7. Surgery/adhesive tape
  8. Bandage scissors (blunt ended) and scalpel blade
  9. Forceps (“tweezers”)-to remove pieces of foreign material (splinter, etc.), or insects (ticks, etc.) that may get lodged in the body 
  10. Tongue depressors
  11. Muzzle or cloth strip
  12. Rubber (latex) and thick leather gloves
  13. Blanket or sheet- mylar foil, cloth, etc
  14. Large and heavy-duty plastic bag
  15. Thermometer- digital, flexible, can be lubricated with antimicrobial ointment for rectal temperature determination
  16. Penlight or small flashlight- to look into the eyes to determine the pupillary light response (PLR) or looking into other cavities (mouth, etc.)
  17. Sterile water or saline/eye irrigating solution- for flushing out the eyes, nose, or a skin wound.
  18. Non-stinging antiseptic solution (like Chlorhexidine 2-4 % solution)
  19. Rubbing alcohol pads or liquid
  20. Antimicrobial ointment (bacitracin, neomycin, and polymyxin B for bacteria +/- miconazole for yeast)- for puncture wounds, cuts, and scraped
  21. Anti-histamine tablets and ointment (Diphenhydramine HCl= Benadryl 25mg tablet or ointment)- for suspected allergic reactions, such as environmental/seasonal allergies or bees stings
  22. EpiPen Jr (Epinephrine 0.15mg)- for severe allergic reactions, such as bee stings
  23. Corn syrup, honey, or other simple sugar liquid- for suspected hypoglycemia (low blood sugar)
  24. A pet carrier to contain the contents of the kit in an easily transportable format

Related Posts

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Other posts by Dr Patrick Mahaney


Dr Patrick MahaneyDr. Mahaney is a veterinarian from the University of Pennsylvania and a Certified Veterinary Acupuncturist, having been inspired by his own chronic pain from Intervertebral Disc Disease to provide accupuncture to his veterinary clients. In addition to Dr Mahaney's house call integrative veterinary medicine business, California Pet Acupuncture and Wellness, he sees patients on an in-clinic basis atVeterinary Cancer Group in Culver City, CA.

Dr Mahaney writes a veterinary column (Patrick's Blog) forwww.PatrickMahaney.com and contributes to a variety of media, including Perez Hilton's TeddyHilton.com, Fido Friendly, Veterinary Practice News, Healthy Pets and People with Dr Patrick on OutImpactRadio.com, and MSNBC Sunday with Alex Witt and Career Day. His first book, The Uncomfortable Vet, will be available in 2013 through Havenhurst Books





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